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Why Encouraging Conflict is Needed in Fostering Collaboration

Why Encouraging Conflict is Needed in Fostering Collaboration

In an ideal world, each one of us would agree with one another. We wouldn’t have painful arguments or conflicts that would later create more damaging issues. We would be in harmonious circumstances, happily going on our own ways.

Realistically speaking, this ideology is impossible to achieve. Whenever we force each other to agree with one another, the more we grow farther apart.

This idyllic expectation of sunshine and rainbows is crushing collaboration. Instead of being the messy back-and-forth process it naturally is, we force it to become harmonious. We expect everyone to concur and be supportive towards everyone yet this constant desire hinders partnerships in fulfilling its promises of greater innovation and improved risk moderation. At its universal form, collaboration coincides with healthy conflict.

Conflict and Collaboration

A large majority of us have been taught to see collaboration and conflict as two different things.  The common narrative for teams include perfect synchronization and tight formation. As players gathered in one team, you should “all be in the same boat” and to be a good member, you must “row in the same direction” but contrary to popular belief, these dreamy visions of what a team should be is what weakens them.

Nothing is perfect. In collaboration, tension, disagreement and conflict is needed in order to improve the value of an idea. It helps expose the risk of a plan and leads to an enriched trust among the participants.

It’s high time that managements change their mindsets towards conflict. They should start letting go of the idea that it is destructive and embrace its potential to be productive. Moving beyond clichés and daydreams, the activity of collaboration becomes excessive if you only resort to agreeing. American writer and political commentator Walter Lippmann did say, “Where all think alike, no one thinks very much.” In order to make the most out of it, divergence is needed before convergence.

But much to our dismay, our antipathy towards discords is embedded so deep into our thoughts that it takes a great deal of effort to encourage even the most modest disagreements. Though there are certain steps that teams can take in order to develop productive friction when it’s needed.

Encouraging Conflict

First, it’s important for teams to discuss and recognize the different roles of each member and emphasize what each position brings to the project.  Explain how they each contribute to different agendas. Having good composition allows groups to normalize the tension collaboration naturally brings. Fighting for the best solution possible becomes a norm and gives people a new perspective on disagreement with colleagues.

Secondly, the use of personality or style assessment tools helps figure out the differences in each individual. Other than that of stemming from their respective jobs, each member will have a different view on things depending on their personalities. This would help you foresee any personality related conflict that could arise.

Lastly, in order to normalize and encourage productive conflict, teams should establish sets of ground rules around discord. Figure out behaviors that create positive contributions and separate those that detract from it. It’s important to paint a clear picture of what is, and is not, acceptable behavior to the rest of the team.

It also helps to define processes so that you will have a more-frequent or more-effective conflict.

Admittedly, it’s not enough to simply just follow the aforementioned techniques. Changing people’s mindset towards conflict and disagreement goes beyond. Some teams even go as far as joining coworking spaces to gain brand new perspective. These shared offices take pride in the great communities they create. Its open layout encourages open communication and the diversity of its members shows that there is beauty in each one’s differences.

Little Dreamer, Stop Wasting Time and Start Giving Yourself a Try

Why You Should Stop Wasting Time and Give Yourself a Try

I am twenty-six days away from being officially, truly, a twenty-one year old.

It doesn’t sound weird to other people, but boy, does it seem bizarre to me.

See, six years ago, I firmly believed I would never make it to nineteen – much less, sixteen, if I’m frankly speaking – but here I am, a twenty-year old girl who once believed that the end of the line lingers near. Now I am sitting in front of  a computer – with a regular job.

Somehow, I’m still anticipating the moment when everything is full and it’s finally the time to cut it all out. Yet unlike my younger counter part, I can confidently say that I’m relatively smarter than her. With a braver heart, a clearer perspective and a deeper comprehension of what truly matters in life, I’d say that I’ve learned a couple of things when I got to this age.

Like, true friends don’t lie and not everything that they think important isn’t actually important.

And, time, really, is of the essence.

As cheesy as it may sound, it is true.

Over cups of coffee and late night sessions of breakdowns, I’ve come to realize just how important it is to have a deep understanding of one’s existence. Hate to be the one to break the bad news, but we humans are only here for an ample amount of time and the bitter reality we oh so love to ignore is that anytime – and I mean, anytime – everything around us could disappear.

In the grand scheme of things, our lives are simply drops of water in the ocean. And because of the relatively limited time we have, shouldn’t we squeeze the most joy out if it? Why are we wasting time over things that make us unhappy and overworked? Why can’t we simply choose what fulfills us and be truly happy?

This is the one thing that a majority of us fears – choosing our career.

Some of us choose to follow the degree we worked so hard on, while some chose to stay away. Where do I belong between the two? Right in the middle.

I didn’t exactly stuck by my degree but I didn’t veer too away from it. Did everyone agree to it? Of course not.

To them, the idea seemed preposterous. Higher education has the tendency to scare us away from doing something courageous. And we, too, get easily anxious with the idea of putting ourselves at the mercy of other people’s opinions – it gives them a power over us that isn’t easy to reclaim.

So instead of simply doing what makes them happy, majority of my folks simply settle.

Unlike most of them, I’ve already made up my mind before I even got up that stage to get my certificate – I cannot, and will not, let myself be glued to a job that I despise.

Yes, not everyone agreed with the decisions I’ve made and yes, I was terrified of handing my creative sanity to another person’s hand but I’ve made the conscious choice of not putting myself through years and years of possible misery.

It wasn’t easy – but then again, nothing is ever easy.

I stopped wasting time and gave myself a try. Because, truthfully, we can never ever tell what would happen next. Our fears and anxieties are most definitely there but sometimes, they’re just vague foresights of what the future might hold.

Whenever I talk to close friends – or anyone close to my age, to be honest – I always try and remind them that their future lies in their hands. That everyone has strong opinions but it doesn’t necessarily make them true.

So why not just do what truly makes you happy? If sticking with your Law degree and slowly making your way to that sweet position of a judge fills your heart with warmth, go do it. And if making content for Youtube makes you smile, do it.

What they say don’t matter; because for one, it’s your life and two, there’s plenty of opinions around but it’s not always right.

Our generation is pretty lucky. Lucky in a sense that, the mindset towards work is changing. Digital nomads are ruling the workforce and traditions such as nine-to-five jobs and ordinary offices are now replaced by flexible time and coworking spaces that inspire people to be themselves. A community lies within these shared offices whose sole purpose for existing is to become a support group to everyone who made the brave choice of doing what they love. We’re not alone anymore. You and I, have become part of something larger than ourselves.

The older generation have managed to give us the freedom that they never have. And though the stigma to these non-traditional trends still remains, everything seems possible – that is, of course, if you put your mind into it.

Go, give yourself a try.

Who knows what the future entails for you, little dreamer. And if it still scares you, talk to us today and we’ll give you a few words of encouragement.

Questions To Ask Your New Found Friend: Making Conversations

Questions To Ask Your New Found Friend: Making Conversations

So you’ve recently joined your very first coworking space! You’ve gotten to know the work area – where the private offices are, the café and snack bar, as well as the usual schedule of the daily pool tournament. Despite of this, there’s one more thing left to do now that you’ve settled down; making friends.

We’ve all been in the awkward situation of being the new person – a fish out of water to simply put. Usually taking place at networking events, industry conferences, charity events, dinner parties, and other social-professional circumstances, we are often forced to build our rapport quickly. Like any other human being, we attempt breaking the silence by asking:

“So, what do you do?”

It’s a pretty standard question, we think to ourselves. A large majority of us – if not, I think almost everyone – believes that talking about one’s respective work is one of the best way to build a connection with someone we recently met. But in reality, it’s actually the opposite – in fact, it’s best to avoid this exact topic.

Multiplex Ties

According to experts from network science and psychology, humans tend to seek out relationships that has more than one context for connecting with another person. Known as multiplex ties among sociologist, these are connections that has overlapping roles or affiliations from different social contexts. For example, if a coworker happens to live in the same condominium as you or you both go to the same gyms, it means that you share a multiplex tie.

Experts believe that the reason we prefer these kinds of connections is because of the ideology that relationships built on multiplex ties tend to be richer, more trustworthy, and longer lasting. This can be observed in our daily lives: those coworkers who also happen to be actual friends is far more likely to be with you should one of you decide to change careers. This goes the other way too, those who have at least one actual friend at work are prone to liking their jobs more.

Analysis of Common Questions

Going back to the question “What do you do?” why shouldn’t we use this as an opener?

Say you’re already attending a work-related gathering or simply meeting a new individual under the context of work, it quickly sets a boundary in the conversation that he or she is simply a “work” contact. Though yes, there’s a possibility of discovering another commonality between the two of you but the chance of the conversation heading towards the aforementioned direction is slim to none.

So instead, consider starting with questions that are deliberately non-work related. Trust that the context of the conversation will eventually go back to work-related topics.

Here are some questions that you can use to start conversations with and will hopefully help you discover more commonalties and even gain you a new friend:

• What excites you right now?

This question opens up a wide range of possible answers. In addition to this, it gives the person the freedom to talk about work, kids, or simply anything that excites them.

• What are you looking forward to?

This works for the same reason mentioned earlier but is far more forward-looking than backward looking. This gives the person a bigger set of possible answers.

• What’s the best thing that happened to you this year?

Similar to the aforementioned two questions but is more backward-looking than forward. Regardless, it’s once again an open-ended question that gives others plentiful of answers to choose from.

• Where did you grow up?

Though this question dives into one’s backgrounds, it’s a much less assertive than asking where they came from. It allows them to answer with simple details of their childhood or engage the story of how they got where they are and what they’re doing.

• What do you do for fun?

As expected, this steers the discussion from work – unless of course they are lucky enough land a job that they’d be doing for fun. Yet in the end, it’s the type of question that will stir non-work answers.

 

These examples of open-ended questions help create multiplex ties in relationship – a concept that coworking spaces often cultivate. These shared offices are designed to create new connections in different circumstances and environments.

Looking Through Rose-Colored Glasses: Forced Workplace Positivity

Looking Through Rose-Colored Glasses: Forced Workplace Positivity

Over the recent years, much emphasis have been given to the importance of keeping one’s employees happy. With several literatures on how it affects their work performance and tenure, it got organizations in a frenzy to turn their working environments upside down. Tech conglomerate Google has installed slides in its Zurich office while online retailer Zappos have encouraged some of its workers to dress up as their favorite animal on certain days. Fussball as well as pool tables and other gaming facilities can now be found in several contemporary offices – proof that organizations are going great lengths just to make their talents happier in order for them to work longer hours and be more productive.

The aforementioned ideology roots way back during the 1930s. Little do managements know that you can’t force everything to be rose-colored. The moment that you start coercing, it creates a crack in the system that could cause a greater gap in the long run.

You Can’t Always Be Rose-Colored, In General

From inspirational Instagram accounts to self-help books teaching us how to harness perpetual positivity, everyone – literally, everyone­ – is berating us to “look on the brighter side”. Though statements of the same nature are usually said in with good intent, there is a truth that is hard to accept for a majority of us; that not everyone wears their rose-colored glasses everywhere.

In fact, science says that in order for us to actually be happy, we need to take them off once in a while

Danish psychology professor Svend Brinkmann says that forcing ourselves – and other people – to be consistently cheerful creates more damage than good.

Of course, he takes into consideration that there are individuals who carry a brighter outlook in life than most. Yet at the same time, he acknowledges the dangers of forcing other people to be rose-colored.

When happiness becomes a constant necessity, it hinders us from the ability to cope during or after bad situations. Brinkmann adds we should be able to feel what we feel whenever unfortunate events happen. Fear, anxiety, sadness, and all the other similar negative feelings are the necessary evil that life comes with. We need to be open to dark times so that when they happen – and they will, as he says – it won’t strike us as intense as it would if we’re accustomed to nothing but pure positivity.

Forcing Happiness at Work

Brinkmann adds that when a company turns their employees’ happiness into commodities, they are exploiting them as humans who carry emotions. Hence, it’s not safe to simply settle on a one-size-fits-all solution.

If managements want to really increase the engagement of their talents and keep them upbeat, they shouldn’t just settle on bandaid solutions. It’s detrimental that companies view their workforce as complex human beings instead of oversimplifying their emotions. This means creating a proper dialogue with them in order to consider their individual needs.

When you enforce employees to “smile their worries away”, we are banning the negative emotions they need to truly deal with difficult circumstances. Therefore, creating a deeper emotional damage.

Authenticity

As mentioned earlier, organizations are encouraged to take a deeper look on what would make their employees happier. Each workforce would have a different view on what can cheer them up and some would simply be downbeat interventions. Overall, organizations shouldn’t force feed happiness. Instead, they should focus on looking for different ways of reaching the needs of each talent.

For one, allowing some employees to work from their respective homes can be a good start. And if your management is feeling a bit generous, maybe you can give certain teams access to coworking spaces for all the hard work they have been doing.

These shared offices gives members the chance to work in a much more lax environment and allows them to concentrate and work on projects on their own pace – a perk that satisfies a majority of workers.

The reality that not everyone can – or should – be always positive or happy is quite hard to accept for most people but a person’s happiness is more than just vodka shots or slides. Don’t reconstruct so easily, talk to us today and we’ll help you find a desk for your unhappy employee.

How Anxiety Becomes The Root Cause To Excessive Working

How Anxiety Becomes The Root Cause To Excessive Working

An average person’s ideal career life would kick start from getting that job they have been dreaming of. After that, they would work hard enough to keep it – or even, master it – so that in the future, they can relax and take the much needed break they deserve. Yet as the time passes by, instead of flying in business-class airplanes to luxurious cities, those who have “made it” seem to be working more and more hours than they did before. Missing meals, coming in early and staying in late.

It makes people wonder, shouldn’t successful people be enjoying the fruit of all the hard work and labor they have invested instead of working even more? University of London Professor of Management of Professional Service Firms, Laura Empson, helps us understand the factors that drive employees to overwork themselves.

A Recent Trend

The stories of managers and other administrative positions working long hours have become common recently. It has become a norm for a majority of us to overwork ourselves despite of the knowledge that it’s bad for both our mental and physical health.

Truthfully speaking, things weren’t like this before. Way back, white-collar workers would work as hard as they could at the beginning of their career in order for them to earn the right to be receive rewards later on. All of their perseverance would result to a secured tenure and what could possibly be a series of senior positions.

Once you’ve won first place in the competition, you would become a partner. And partnerships would mean autonomy and flexibility in when to work as well as what to work on.

But contrary to popular belief, this tradition has long been erased in the culture of organizations. Seniors are working harder than ever and the rest of the firm simply follows.

Anxiety, Overworking and Other Contributing Factors

Empson said in a statement from a Harvard Business Review article that the tendency of overworking one’s self is framed by a compound combination of factors such as profession, organization and themselves. According to her research, at the heart of it is a professional’s insecurity. Employees in general, have anxiety peaks whenever contemplating about when work is actually done, how their respective management perceives its people, and most importantly, what counts as hard work. This indefinite knowledge regarding work delivery causes anxiety attacks since there’s no concrete way of telling when the aforementioned tasks is actually completed.

Professionals are constantly out to reassure their employers that they are worth the high salary they are being paid for and that they are far more valuable than their closest colleague. And when working outside the regular hours and staying late a few days a week starts to become so familiar its normal. Overworking goes unnoticed and we find ourselves taking more responsibilities in order to fulfill the need to “contribute efficiently” to the company.

But it’s not just the inherent self-doubt of employees causing this phenomenon. Organizational pressures also contributes to it so much so that even the most established members of the workforce feel the need to stay in late.

Empson’s research revealed that some firms actually hire insecure overachievers on purpose for their incredible ambitiousness and motivation. These are the kind of self-disciplined people pursuing elite positions. The constant need for validation is what drives them work harder in order to prove themselves worthy.

She notes that though it can be rewarding and exhilarating, it’s important to consider how this work related anxiety affects your daily living. It’s vital that we acknowledge how we are driving ourselves – as well as our staff – too hard. Empson emphasizes that there is a  need to learn how to help your team and that it’s important to take a step back when things are getting out of hand.

A Perfect Balance

Slowly but surely, administrators and other heads of organizations are recognizing the said phenomenon. Small steps are being implemented to slowly incorporate wellness breaks into their respective cultures.

And one of the most common solutions is transferring teams into coworking spaces.

The promise of a better work-life balance and a supportive community is just a sampler of what the shared offices can offer. Freelancers, startups, and now, large companies are joining the movement in hopes of finding that spark in doing what they love. With a diverse group of people all aiming to collaborate and support one another, individuals start to feel less and less insecure about their work. Moreover, it provides them a brand new security that the hours they are already putting in is enough to be classified as hard work.

Learn more about how a change in surrounding can lessen over working by booking a tour with us today!

Understanding The Growing Demand For Pets Inside Offices

Understanding The Growing Demand For Pets Inside Offices

Pets have always been a thing.

Since time immemorial, these adorable creatures have accompanied us through majority of our lives. We take them with us to almost everywhere – restaurants, shops and even during our travels.

Remember that one woman from New York who tried to bring her pet peacock to Los Angeles with her? The aforementioned artist bought her service animal a seat to the flight yet in the end, it was denied entry – much to her dismay. The colorful bird is actually an emotional companion and he’s not the first one to go through that same airline. Last January 2016, a turkey boarded a Delta flight and later that year, a duck flew from Charlotte to New Carolina – both of which are service animals to their owners.

It’s a thing and though it stirs confusion to a majority of the audience, it’s an actual rising phenomenon. Pets can now be seen not just in airplanes, but even in offices.

Pets and Mental Health

Newark Liberty International Airport reports that there’s a 75 percent year-over-year increase of customers bringing emotional support pets or animals on flights. Its administration understands the need of passengers with disabilities, hence, they are doing all that they can to serve them whilst still taking into consideration the safety and well-being of their employees and other customers.

This growing number has a scientific explanation; over the recent years, experts have found evidence showing that animals don’t just bring health improvements to the table, they can also help improve their owner’s mental health – and this includes individuals with challenging disorders.

Though admittedly, the studies are significantly small, the reported benefits carry enough weight for clinical settings to open themselves up to animal-assisted interventions such as pet therapy alongside conventional treatments. Science have said that social support – a well-proven cure to anxiety and loneliness – can sometimes come on four legs. Animals can help alleviate stress, fear and anxiety in kids, elderly and basically, everyone in between.

Paw Friendly Workplaces

Because of the growing awareness of the upside of having these cute creatures around, the number of households with pets – commonly, cats and dogs – are rising. Their owners? Majorly members of the millennial generation.

With full time jobs, these professionals are constantly on the look-out for pet-friendly offices. What made dogs and cats wandering around corporate floors possible? The movement of coworking spaces.

Not only did they open their doors to pets in order to attract the younger demographic of today’s workforce, providers moved by the positive impact the aforementioned animals creates — such as, improved productivity and higher job satisfaction. Moreover, they promote a warmer and friendlier culture – a kind of environment that everyone seems to be looking for.

These shared offices allows its members to bring their own pets with them to work. Its open plan layout gives plenty room for them to wander around and spreading smiles throughout the premise. Though there are hygiene and noise concerns with having them around, certain coworking spaces balances the interest of both pet and non-pet owners by allowing them in once a week or once a month.

As weird as the whole concept of pets around the office is, it’s one of the many living evidence that we can create a happy work environment that will benefit everyone within the facility. Talk to us today and we’ll help you warm up your company culture!

The Flaw Within Networking Events

The Flaw Within Networking Events

Networking events – we’ve all probably attended one or if not, have been invited to at some point of our life. It’s one of those initially promising gatherings that are undeniably awkward in nature. Most attendees would dress up and make the effort of going in the hopes that they’ll meet new contacts that could be of help later on in their career. Yet truthfully speaking, these same individuals would end up in a corner, drinking and chatting with someone they already knew.

One would assume that introverts would probably despise such events but much to the surprise of everyone, even extroverts carry indifferent views towards them. It’s not just reserved peers who come home feeling that they’ve wasted their time, outgoing attendees would often wonder why they never made the most of their day at these events.

Keynote speaker and best-selling author David Burkus reassures professionals that there’s nothing wrong with them. The event itself is the one that’s actually failing.

A Gap in the Networking Events Design

After reviewing dozens of studies on networking events in preparation for his book Friend of a Friend” Understanding the Hidden Networks That Can Transform Your Life and Your Career”, Burkus wrote in a Harvard Business Review article that there’s an overall implication that the aforementioned gatherings don’t actually live up to their name. A majority of us resorts to staying inside of our own comfort zones – talking to colleagues present or people we deem similar to us – in situations that require us to meet new people. The idea of networking events is doomed by its very design alone.

A notable study conducted by two Columbia Business School professors presented that even the well-intentioned professionals fail to meet enough new people to justify the affectivity of system. It became clear to them that our comfort zones can be a little too inviting.

So how do we avoid the magnetic pull of staying inside our bubble? Simply, stop trying.

New Circumstances and Situations

Weird as it seems, one of the best strategies is to actually stop trying to meet new people.

If we want to make new connections with diverse individuals, we must shift our focus from the relationship itself to activities that you can participate in. Sociologist and network scientist Brian Uzzi says that meaningful networks aren’t made through casual interactions. Rather, they thrive in high-stake activities that allows people to connect in deeper ways.

The one flaw with networking events is that it carries no other goal than to get people into conversations. Without a bigger purpose, there’s little to no incentive for individuals to move beyond activities that make them comfortable.

The higher the stakes, the more we push further to meet and connect with more diverse groups.

A Deeper Connection

The well-known movement of shared offices and coworking spaces stands as living proof that spontaneous interactions create better connections.

Priding itself in authentic communities, its open layout have allowed members to casually interact and socialize with one another. Its gathering events allows them to form deeper connections than those that root from networking events.

Talk to us today and we’ll help you build stronger relationships while having fun!

Diversity: How Individual Differences Produce Creativity

Diversity: How Individual Differences Produce Creativity

A large majority of today’s budding entrepreneurs are setting aside cultural and political differences in the hopes of creating a more diverse team within the workforce. The reason behind this trend? The premise that organizations with a wide variety of members are far more creative than those of teams coming from a similar background.

With several literatures backing up this ideology and the constant encouragement by the public to break down walls, it’s not surprising that a lot of companies are looking to diversify their workplace.

Still the question remains, just how much can diversity affect the creativity of one team? How does one strengthen them through leadership and inclusion?

The Different Influences

For us to evaluate just how effective it is in enhancing inventiveness, it’s important to know how it influences idea generation and implementation. Viewed as two different scenarios, the diversity of a team dictates just how successful they will be in generating ideas and implementing ideas.

Recent experimental studies have suggested that though heterogeneous team composition seen as an advantage in producing a wider range of original ideas, its benefits ultimately weaken when it’s time to decide which among them will be implemented. A meta-analysis conducted on 108 studies and more than 10,100 teams report that the enhanced creativity produced by teams with higher diversity is interrupted by deep-rooted social conflict and decision-making dilemmas that are rarely found in homogenous groups.

Though it follows the creative process of free thinking, openness to failure and mind wandering, it should be immediately followed by convergent thinking and effective project management for it to become actual innovations. It takes more than just diversity to implement a company’s wide array of creative ideas.

Strong Leadership

Admittedly, diverse teams are prone to conflicts, and these arguments can only be mitigated if they are lead effectively. It’s not rocket science that strong leadership is a fundamental resource for organizations across industries.

When members set aside their own agendas to corroborate with others for the common benefit of the project, the natural tension between wanting to get ahead of prospect competition  and needing to get along with everyone is articulated.

It’s important for homogenous teams to learn how to empathize with their coworkers and to see things from other perspectives. Only when they have learned to manage their own conscious and unconscious biases will they be able to agree on one thing.

Inclusivity and Knowledge Sharing Culture

“Diversity is being invited to the party. Inclusion is being asked to dance” diversity advocate, Verña Myers said. In order for leaders and organizations to truly stick with practicing diversity, it’s important that everyone feels they are included, that their voices matter.

Hence, creating an open knowledge sharing culture is present within the team to truly enhance creativity. Everyone should be encouraged to speak up and leaders need to create an environment wherein it’s safe to share novel ideas. Implementing feedback and sharing credit for team success also aids in promoting inclusivity.

Diversity: A Place for Everyone

Though skeptics would say that diversity may bring more problems and complications than creativity, the rising movement of coworking spaces is proof that diversity and inclusivity could create great results for everyone participating.

Well-known for its diverse community, these shared offices are attracting startups, entrepreneurs and even large corporations across several industries for the authentic networking it provides to its members. With a culture that promotes inclusivity and interdisciplinary collaborations, coworking allows professionals to experience what its like to work when the walls separating us from one another is diminished.

Creativity isn’t the only thing that businesses can unlock when they create diverse representation and inclusivity in their workforce. Though complicated and intricate, the process is worth it when it leads the team to sustainable growth.

Produce equal opportunities for every member of your team and talk to us today about coworking spaces!

Taking Risks: How Stephen Curry’s Strategy Helped Build His Career

Taking The Right Risks: How Stephen Curry's Strategy Helped Build His Career

Famous NBA player Stephen Curry triumphs roots from hard work and passion, but there’s another component present behind his success story; courage – the daring acts of taking new risks every game.

Curry has built his career around taking three pointers from crazy distances – shots that not a lot of mundane players would take. Defenders tend to dismiss these long-distanced shots because of the low likelihood of the ball actually making it to the basket, but the basketball star worked and worked until the chances weren’t unlikely for him.

The game that Curry built for himself is a classic example of braving competitive risks. Instead of going head-to-head against other players in the scarce area right under the ring, he would set himself in a place where others wouldn’t even dare to think of going for” 30 feet away from the basket. He developed a distinctive strength of making long-distance shots.

And though it seems like the aforementioned game plan can only be applied in sports, experts suggest that the same disruptive strategy can be implemented in business. Look for a gap, something that isn’t being done, something that nobody else is doing it. See if it would be beneficial for you to learn how to be good at it.

Disruptive Moves and Right Risks

If you’re having second thoughts on your career or feel that your skills have gone rusty, then maybe it’s high time that you shake up your career path. These precarious moves are what keeps a career from stagnating.

It’s a high-percentage move that if done well, offers great possibilities of success, rapid acceleration, and hyper-growth. A majority of us have become aware of the importance of market risks when it comes to starting a business, but not a lot of us know that the same unprecedented moves are what fuels individual growth. Businesses can only create disruption in the market if it starts from those behind its operations.

People often fail implementing these risks because they don’t know what it looks like when applied to their own careers, so here are a few ideas that you can use to accelerate your career:

• Curate a position with your strengths as a template

Etsy’s general counsel, Sarah Feingold, landed her job by convincing the organization’s founder that they need her as an in-house counsel. She took interest of offering up her services because of her side job as a jeweler on Etsy. Mixing her artistic talent and passion for law, she managed to land a role that didn’t exist yet.

It’s not hard to find stories of career sprouting from an individual’s love for a certain activity or skill. Visit your local coworking space and there you would see a handful of freelancers creating a living out of their hobbies.

Find something you’re good at and start from there.

• Look for opportunities outside your comfort zone

Don’t let the discipline written on your diploma stop you from exploring. Truth is, a majority of today’s in demand jobs requires a wide range of skills – some of which was never taught in college during our early years. Each individual carries a set of skills that can contribute to several jobs. It’s up to us to get out of our box and look for opportunities in places we’ve never dared to.

One good example of this is the collaborative culture built within coworking spaces. The interdisciplinary environment that these shared offices have made it possible for its members to corroborate with one another and help each other find new opportunities outside their domains.

The successful collaborations made within its diverse community is proof that challenging the status quo can actually produce great results.

 

Creating risk-embracing moves helps generate innovation within teams, firms and even industries. Ask yourself if there is an unmet need or unoccupied niche that you can fulfill with your skills. This is your new opportunity, so be brave and take it.

Talk to us today and we’ll help you conquer your fear of taking the long shot.

How Office Structure and Design Affects Workplace Innovation

How Office Structure and Design Affects Workplace Innovation

According to recent studies, an average person would usually spend 22.4% of their lives working. Considering that the average working week falls around 40 hours, that equates 1,960 hours per year once the holidays are deducted and assuming that they start their career at the age of 21 and retires once they hit 65, that’s a span of 44 working years. Using the same 409-hour working week, the final number is 91,250 hours.

And when someone – or something – spends 91, 250 hours inside an office or a workspace, he or she is bound to be affected by the environment present within its walls. The design of the space matters for it has the power to influence individuals engaged in the surroundings – be it indirectly contributing a new insight or forming extremities.

And with the majority of today’s working demographic devoting their efforts in competing with one another, each and every one of the players are on the hunt for ways to leverage innovation in their respective teams. One practical way of reaching office design goals is by being thoroughly understanding of how work space designs matter.

Understanding The Importance of Innovation

Well-established architects around the world have said that innovative spaces should be able to strengthen interactions, communication,  as well as collaborations. Its design and structure should be open, transparent and contextually responsive. There is a growing understanding amongst the majority that breakthroughs are usually the result of a greater collective working on formulating innovations. People need people – together, talented individuals create greater possibilities of achieving brilliant solutions.

Acclaimed author and expert John Seely Brown says that organizations who are constantly spearheading innovations don’t just possess visionary leadership and organizational commitment to creating new ideas, they are also supported by a place that underpin innovation. And with workspaces acting as the stage for overall work experience, it needs to be able to be effective on all fronts – from supporting its operations with the appropriate technology and tools down to positively influencing its culture.

The existing symbiotic relationship amongst the said components can create a multi-dimensional aid to successful innovations if integrated seamlessly. When done right, offices can both inspire and facilitate breakthroughs.

The Makings of An Innovative Space

The presence of co-working spaces, incubators and other innovation centers is proof that there is a growing need for offices that cradle the process of revolution. And though each kind carries a significant distinction that varies them form one another, there is a recognizable similarity in them – purpose and function.

Overriding aesthetics, architects and several designers have come back to the core of designs strengthening the “humanness” of the office. Gone are the flashy furnishings putting less emphasis on style and focusing its efforts on what the members needs – as a team and as individuals.

The well-known movement of coworking spaces prides itself in opening new ways of communication and sharing. Offering members a wide range of spaces for several unique activities in one place, providers have collaborated with those who will potentially use them. They have elevated their needs and ambitions – elevating employees and guests.

As the rest of the world continue to empower innovation as a new way to support emerging markets and create more jobs, the importance of innovative spaces will continue to rise. These versatile offices and its dynamic environment now serve as key to sustainable business growth.

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